Sonnet of a Ham
October 1947 QST Article

October 1947 QST

October 1947 QST  Cover - RF CafeTable of Contents

Wax nostalgic about and learn from the history of early electronics. See articles from ARRL's QST, published December 1915 - present. All copyrights hereby acknowledged.

I have never been a fan of "free verse" poetry,
be it in the form of a sonnet or otherwise.
In my humble opinion,
poems that do not both rhyme and have some measure of meter
represent laziness on the part of the 'poet.'
Without requiring poetry to rhyme,
all that is required to declare anything a poem
is to break the writing into poem-like lines,
et voilĂ  - you have a poem.
It is like slinging a brush-load of paint
onto a canvas and calling it art.

-- I hereby proclaim the above to be a poem - see what I mean?

I will (reluctantly) excuse the following example since it was written by a Ham about Amateur Radio, and it does satisify the definition of a sonnet regarding juxtaposing unrelated concepts.

Sonnet of a Ham

Today I held the wide world in my hand;

Space rolled away and England's sun was low,

As Ken of Cambridge told me of his land.

Next, fast as thought, as he said, "Cheerio,"

I raced the sun, until at zenith time

O'er western plains I said "Hello" to Lee -

Then "73," and morning skies were mine

As John became my host at Waikiki.

The XYL recalled my wandering

To Georgia's pines, for dinnertime was nigh.

When, afterward, with Venus shimmering

Beside a thin new moon and Mars' red light,

I gazed their way, and wondered as night fell -

"Cannot we hold these in our hands as well?"

- Ewell G. Pigg, W4KGD

 

 

Posted July 19, 2016