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MECA Electronics

Morse Code

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RF Cafe Morse Code

Create your own Morse code MP3 file.

Morse code is a type of character encoding that transmits telegraphic information using rhythm. Morse code uses a standardized sequence of short and long elements to represent the letters, numerals, punctuation and special characters of a given message. The short and long elements can be formed by sounds, marks, or pulses, in on off keying and are commonly known as "dots" and "dashes" or "dits" and "dahs". The speed of Morse code is measured in words per minute (WPM) or characters per minute, while fixed-length data forms of telecommunication transmission are usually measured in baud or bps.

Originally created for Samuel F. B. Morse's electric telegraph in the early 1840s, Morse code was also extensively used for early radio communication beginning in the 1890s. For the first half of the twentieth century, the majority of high-speed international communication was conducted in Morse code, using telegraph lines, undersea cables, and radio circuits. However, the variable length of the Morse characters made it hard to adapt to automated circuits, so for most electronic communication it has been replaced by machine readable formats, such as Baudot code and ASCII. - Wikipedia

See also - Morse Fusion method uses pattern recognition rather than individual characters

 

Letter Morse Letter Morse Letter Morse Letter Morse Digit Morse
A •-   H ••••   O ---   U ••-   0 -----
B -•••   I ••   P •--•   V •••-   1 •----
C -•-•   J •---   Q --•-   W •--   2 ••---
D -••   K -•-   R •-•   X -••-   3 •••--
E   L •-••   S •••   Y -•--   4 ••••-
F ••-•   M --   T -   Z --••   5 •••••
G --•   N -•               6 -••••
                        7 --•••

Create a free Morse Code ringtone (or just get a MIDI file)

  8 ---••
                        9 ----•
Letter Morse   Punctuation Mark Morse

Note:

A dash (-) is three times
the length of a dot (.)

Ä •-•-   Full-stop (.) •-•-•-
Á •--•-   Comma (,) --••--
Å •--•-   Colon (:) ---•••
Ch ----   Question mark (?) ••--••
É ••-••   Apostrophe (') •----•
Ñ --•--   Hyphen (-) -••••-
Ö ---•   Fraction bar (/) -••-•
Ü ••--   Brackets (()) -•--•-
@ •--•-•   Quotation marks (") •-••-•
Mistake, delete last word:  . . . . . . . .
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Copyright: 1996 - 2018
Webmaster:
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    BSEE - KB3UON

RF Cafe began life in 1996 as "RF Tools" in an AOL screen name web space totaling 2 MB. Its primary purpose was to provide me with ready access to commonly needed formulas and reference material while performing my work as an RF system and circuit design engineer. The Internet was still largely an unknown entity at the time and not much was available in the form of WYSIWYG ...

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