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X-Ray Vision for Your Cellphone (using T-rays) - RF CafeUnlike X-rays which can penetrate metal and bone (potentially causing harm in the process), T-rays are in the electromagnetic spectrum lying between infrared and microwave. They can "see through" soft tissue, fabric, low density wood, and other low density materials. Researchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) figured out a way to integrate a complete transmitter, receiver, and phased array antenna onto a single silicon substrate. In doing so they were able to produce enough power in the THz band to enable imaging of high density objects within low density objects. The thumbnail above shows a handgun round and a #11 X-Acto blade buried within a stuffed dog. Super-low production costs will make them cheap to integrate into cellphones and specific-purpose scanners. Privacy is about to take yet another hit as stores, office buildings, public areas, and just about any venue will be saturated with these kinds of devices. Metal pins in your bones, plates in your head, dental fillings, and hidden body piercing will be easily imaged by anyone with a so-equipped phone. Get ready for images of your "unspeakable" areas to be posted on the Web, probably along with a standard visible wavelength version alongside it. Maybe the tinfoil hat crowd might just have been on to something long before the rest of us were smart enough to follow.

California Institute of Technology's T-Ray RFIC - RF Cafe
California Institute of Technology's
T-Ray Microchip
Caltech electrical engineers Kaushik Sengupta and Ali Hajimiri - RF Cafe
Caltech electrical engineers
Kaushik Sengupta and Ali Hajimiri
demonstrate the capabilities of their
terahertz chips for imaging




Posted  July 29, 2013
 
Windfreak Technologies ConductRF Performance RF Cables - RF Cafe
Rohde & Schwarz USA (RF Component Pocket Guide) - RF Cafe
About RF Cafe
Kirt Blattenberger - RF Cafe Webmaster
Copyright: 1996 - 2018
Webmaster:
    Kirt Blattenberger,
    BSEE - KB3UON

RF Cafe began life in 1996 as "RF Tools" in an AOL screen name web space totaling 2 MB. Its primary purpose was to provide me with ready access to commonly needed formulas and reference material while performing my work as an RF system and circuit design engineer. The Internet was still largely an unknown entity at the time and not much was available in the form of WYSIWYG ...

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